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Construction & Engineering, Events, News

Man Engine wows crowds at Somer Valley

Last Friday, 36-foot tall mechanical puppet Man Engine came to Bath College Somer Valley Campus to put on an amazing show, all the while giving an insight into Radstock’s mining history.

 

The sun was shining at the ‘Afternooner’ performance which brought in hundreds of local families.
 
Crowds were entertained by The Natural Theatre Company and the Midsomer Norton & Radstock silver band.
 
The ‘Afterdarker’ performance continued to thrill crowds with the added spectacle of uplighting and pyrotechnics.
 
Nicki Smith attended the evening performance and said “What a fantastic experience! Inspiring story-telling, incredible engineering and poignant details. Thank you for coming to the Somerset coalfields.”
 
The Man Engine show told the story of 14-year-old Harry Sage, who worked as a powder boy at the colliery at Norton Hill and was brought to life by a young actor in the performance. The colliery had a good safety record, however in 1908 a pit explosion killed 10 miners.
 
The event was very well received and brought thousands of local people to the Somer Valley Campus.
 
Daisy Walsh, Commercial Director at Bath College said of the event: “We were delighted to host Man Engine at Bath College.
 
“Somer Valley Campus was the perfect location to host this impressive machine as it is the home of our Engineering Provision covering apprenticeships and 16+ learners and also our Construction Centre.
 
“It was lovely to see the local community from Radstock and the surrounding area enjoying a family day out and taking advantage of having such an exciting event on their doorstep.
 
“We thought the Man Engine show was so impressive and really brought the mining history of Radstock alive.”
 
See below for some of the pictures of the event.
 
 






Care Academy, News

Students trained to support Bath’s first slow shopping project

 

Bath College students will be part of an exciting new project launched this week.
 
Slow Shopping aims to make doing the weekly shop easier for older people, those living with dementia, or anyone who might need a bit of extra time to complete their shopping.
 
Students from the Bath College Care Academy and staff from Waitrose, Bath, are joining together to kick-start the city’s first Slow Shopping project, with the help of funding from the St John’s Foundation.
 
The new Slow Shopping project will deliver training to health and social care students from the Bath College Care Academy and Waitrose staff.
 
They will be on hand to assist shoppers who may require extra time or support to complete their shop. During Slow Shopping sessions, background noise will be limited to create a calm atmosphere in store.
 
The first Slow Shopping session starts on January 23rd. Slow Shopping sessions will run at Waitrose, on Northgate Street, every Tuesday between 10am and 12 noon.
 
Founder Katherine Vero set up Slow Shopping after her mother was diagnosed with dementia.
 
Inspired by her mother’s experience of visiting shops, Slow Shopping works with retailers, training providers and others to advocate a safe environment for those who need to take more time shopping.
 
Katherine said: “I am delighted to be working with such a wonderful team of people to deliver Slow Shopping to the community in Bath.
 
“The commitment and enthusiasm shown by all the partners is heartening and I feel sure that the quality of the support that they can offer to the customers in Waitrose will be both sensitive and effective.
 
“Shopping is such an ordinary activity that it can be underestimated. It has so many benefits especially for those who live with visible, invisible, intellectual or cognitive disability and their carers and families.
 
“A trip to the shops can be a social activity, it can help maintain independence and health and it is a physical exercise involving personal choice.
 
“I want to encourage people who may feel less confident or fearful to come shopping and enjoy the experience, knowing they can get help if they need it.”
 
Bath’s first Slow Shopping project was launched at Bath College on Tuesday January 16th following the first training session for Waitrose staff and Bath College Care Academy students.
 
Sally Wilson, Care Academy Coordinator at Bath College, said: “We’re excited to be working in collaboration to help shape this ground-breaking programme within the local community supporting peoples’ health and wellbeing.
 
“Students will learn so much from working in partnership in this way. They will develop a greater awareness of some of the barriers that those experiencing dementia (and other additional needs) may face when shopping, and the different ways they can support them.
 
“All of this ties in with the main aim of The Bath College Care Academy: to enhance students’ employability skills by working with partners to provide a wide range of work experience opportunities within the health and social care sector.”
 

Care Academy, News

Health and social care students capture First World War memories

 

Students at Bath College are taking part in a local history project to help preserve peoples’ memories of the First World War.
 
The Project, called A Century’s Memories, is being run by Bath & North East Somerset Council with £7,100 from the Heritage Lottery Fund.
 
Young people aged 15 to 21-years-old are being trained and supported to conduct interviews in four different areas of the county.
 
Level 3 health and social care students Kellie Crossthwaite and Freya Game have already started interviewing community members in Radstock.
 
At the start of January, they spoke to David Taylor, whose father George Henry Taylor started work in the coalmines at 13-years-old.
 
He was 16 when he enlisted with the Somerset Light Infantry, and after a couple of month’s training, was sent to fight in France.
 
Kellie and Freya have recorded George’s story to be included in an illustrated commemorative book.
 
The interview will be kept at the Bath Record Office and used to produce online learning resources for seven to 11-year-olds in schools.
 
Freya, 20, said: “I thought it seemed a really interesting project. I’ve read a lot about the First World War, but it’s nice to hear real-life stories from people who have a connection with the past.
 
“I’ve learned a lot, and I’ve enjoyed speaking to David. It’s given me more confidence in meeting people and being able to build up a connection with them.”
 
A Century’s Memories is part of Bath & North East Somerset Council’s plans to commemorate the centenary of the First World War between 2014 and 2018.
 
This month, health and social care students will also interview members of the Larkhall Friendship Circle at New Oriel Hall and members of the Women’s Royal Army Corps Association in Bath.
 
All students studying health and social care have access to the Bath College Care Academy, a partnership set up between employers and the college to provide work experience and training.
 
After the project is completed, there will be a number of celebration and sharing events in September and October.
 
Mr Taylor, who shared his dad’s photos and war medals during the interview, said: “Dad spent most of the First World War fighting, getting injured and going back to the front again.
 
“Out of 60 members of his regiment, he was one of two people to survive. I wanted people to hear what happened during the war, and I think the students have done extremely well.
 
“There are very few people left with direct family who were involved in the First World War, so it’s a good thing they’re doing. I will be interested to see what they do with the interviews, and so will my family.
 
“I have two grandsons who took dad’s medals to school for a show and tell, and they are quite proud of him.”
 

Care Academy, News

Bath College Care Academy: Students tested during inter-college competition

 

Students had to think on their feet at an inter-college competition testing their team work, presentation skills and ability to react to challenging situations.
 
The competition, for early years and health and social care students, was hosted by the Bath College Care Academy and also involved competitors from Wiltshire and Frome Colleges.
 
Competitors were given an interactive display board and presentation task, with early years students focusing on outdoor play and how children can benefit from this.
 

Competitors from Bath College
 
Early years students also had to take part in a role play, in which they met a parent to discuss a child who is about to start at nursery and talked about helping them to settle in.
 
During their role play, health and social care students met Pearl, an elderly lady about to be moved to a care home. They were asked to assess her needs and decide how best to help her.
 

 
The Bath College Care Academy is partnership between health and social care employers and Bath College, set up to prepare students for working in industry by providing work experience and training.
 
Employers at the competition included Isa Richer, from the Swainswick Explorers Pre-school Club, Judith Green, from Bath Mind’s Food for Thought programme, and Louise Malkin and Jacqui Watson, from Riverside Nursery.
 
Congratulations to the following winners from the competition:
 
Health and social care: Shanrece Ferguson and Patti Poplawska.
 
Early years: Katherine Ogborne and Jordan McMahon.
 
Childcare lecturer Abigail Holt said: “The competition went very well and all of the participating students were fantastic.
 
“It gave them an opportunity to network and share their knowledge with peers and employers, and was a great opportunity to bring employers into a college-based event.
 
“We are looking forward to holding similar events in the future and inviting more college to take part.”
 

Care Academy, News

Student wins award for making a real difference during work experience

 

Health and social care student Obed Adomako was praised for his sensitive and understanding approach at this year’s Care & Support West (CSW) Care Awards.
 
Obed, a second year student at Bath College, won an award at the ceremony for time spent volunteering as a frontline care worker for healthcare company Dimensions.
 
The 19-year-old completed a three-month work experience placement at accommodation on Rivers Street, Bath, helping people with daily tasks such as cooking, cleaning and shopping.
 

 
He was invited to a special dinner at the Ashton Gate Stadium in Bristol after being nominated for the award by Jane Colenso, BANES Locality Manager at Dimensions.
 
Obed said: “I enjoy doing work experience, seeing how everything works in practice helps you learn quicker.
 
“Most of the people I was working with had impaired movement, so helping them to get back on their feet was really satisfying.
 
“I would go in once a week to help out for a full day, I was there from 8am to 3pm, so I got to know people fairly well.
 
“Just seeing them smile makes it worth it, I’d definitely do it again.”
 
Jane, who was Obed’s placement supervisor, said: “In the short time that Obed has been working for Dimensions, he has made a real difference.
 
“He supported a service user who had become withdrawn and felt unable to leave his flat, helping him to clear the paved area in front of his flat.
 
“His gentle and encouraging approach has helped to inspire the service user, fostering his wellbeing and enabling him to take an interest in the wider world and his local community.
 
“Nothing seems too much trouble for Obed, he has impressed with his conscientious and person-centred approach and has fitted in well with all members of the team.”
 
Health and social care students at Bath College can progress onto a wide range of higher education courses, including nursing, midwifery, primary teaching and psychology. Some go straight into caring roles and may choose an apprenticeship route.
 
As part of their course, Level 3 students need to do 300 hours of work experience and aim for three different placements.
 
In December, students will be invited to apply for work experience through the Bath College Care Academy, which will enable students to have structured work experience opportunities linked to local employers.
 
Successful students will spend time on rotation working for Somerset Care, Sirona Care & Health, Dimensions, Way Ahead Care, the Royal United Hospital and Swallow, a charity for teenagers and adults with learning disabilities.
 
Obed, from Bristol, grew up in Italy and came to the UK when he was 16-years-old, originally enrolling at college to study for his GCSEs.
 
He hopes to go on to study physiotherapy at university and is currently looking for work experience in this area.
 
He said: “Being nominated for the award has given me the motivation to put in 100 per cent at all times, because you don’t know who will be watching your work and where it will take you.
 
“Sometimes it’s hard finding work experience, but it always pays off. This experience will really help me when I come to do my personal statement for university.”
 

Football Academy, News

New women’s football academy: Manager Charlie Griffin chosen as head coach

 

Bath College has chosen football manager Charlie Griffin to coach teenagers joining its new women’s academy in September.
 
The academy, in partnership with Bath City FC, will help to meet an increasing demand for women’s football from young players in the past few years.
 
Charlie, who is manager at Cirencester Town, has been coaching at the Bath City Community Sports Foundation for over six years.
 

 
Charlie Griffin with Alex Gaiger (Deputy Head of Department for Sport, Leisure and Care) and Dan Bowman, football coach at Bath City Community Sports Foundation
 
He began playing professional football at a young age and his CV includes playing for Swindon, Wickham, Stevenage and Bath City.
 
The former striker said: “At the Bath City Community Sports Foundation, we’ve built up the girls’ football team and we’ve seen it grow over the years.
 
“This programme will be different for the players. To start with they might ache a bit, but we’re there to help them move up a level and improve them as a footballer.
 

 
Football players at an open training session for the women’s academy, at Odd Down Playing Fields 
 
“This is a great opportunity to work with the college, and for these girls it gives them a real focus. If they can look to the world cup and the England women’s team, and see a progression route, that helps to inspire them.
 
“I started off at four-years-old kicking a ball around. I was at the Bristol Rovers academy until I was 16, when I was released, but I never gave up and worked hard to get signed for Swindon.
 
“That’s what I tell the girls who train with us, never give up and that determination will pay off. We would love one of these girls to play in the women’s premier league one day, because the talent is out there.”
 

 
Sam Spong, sports student Ellie, and Paul Blenkinsopp (from Bath College).
 
Players training at the academy, which is unique to Bath, will train three times a week at the Bath College gym and Odd Down Sports Ground.
 
They will play matches on Wednesday as part of the ECFA (English Colleges Football Association) and will study for a Level 2 or Level 3 BTEC in sport.
 
Lecturer in sport, Paul Blenkinsopp, said: “It is great for the college to have Charlie leading the coaching of our new women’s football academy.
 
“He not only brings a vast knowledge from the men’s professional game, but has been coaching girls for five to six years as part of his role at the Bath City Community Sports Foundation. This knowledge and understanding of women’s football will be vital for our first year, but also as we look to grow and strengthen the programme over the coming years.
 
“There are still places available on the women’s academy and I encourage anyone who is interested to contact me for more information.”
 
To find out about the women’s football academy, register online, call (01225) 312191 or e-mail paul.blenkinsopp@bathcollege.ac.uk.
 

Care Academy, News

Preparing for employment: Students take part in hundreds of mock interviews

 

Students from across Bath College have been preparing for employment with a series of mock interview sessions.
 
The college’s Futures Team organised 137 interviews over two days for students who will finish their courses in the summer.
 
Students studying sport, performing arts, business and travel and tourism got a taste of what it’s like to face scrutiny in an interview situation.
 
A wide variety of businesses offered to help on the day, including the Bath Building Society, Barclays, ESPA UK and solicitors Lyons Davidson.
 

 
Employability adviser Lucy Beattie said: “This was an invaluable experience for students. To have employers who they hadn’t met conduct real interviews and give feedback will hugely help them when they come to job and further education interviews.
 
“The interviews helped them learn how to answer standard interview questions, and to see their CVs from an employers’ point of view.
 
“The feedback has been hugely positive, with at least three employers wanting to see candidates again to interview for real jobs and work experience being offered on the spot.”
 
Health and social care students also took part in a day of interviews with industry professionals as part of the Bath College Care Academy.
 

 
Employers visiting the college included Creative Youth Network, St Monica Trust, Way Ahead Care, Dimensions, Youth Connect and the Royal United Hospitals Bath.
 
Freya Game, 19, is a first year student studying Level 3 health and social care, and took part in the Dimensions group interview.
 
She said: “It was really helpful talking to them and being able to give us tips. It wasn’t as intimidating as I expected and I’d feel a bit more confident going into this kind of interview situation now.
 
“I’m not sure what area of care I want to go into yet, but I would consider working with Dimensions because this has been really interesting.”
 
Nick French, recruitment manager for St Monica Trust, is looking for 100 care workers for Keynsham’s Chocolate Quarter.
 
He said: “It’s just nice to get that connection with people who are at the beginning of their careers.
 
“I understand how difficult it is when people are starting out in their careers. It’s a catch 22 situation: it’s difficult to get the job without experience, and it’s difficult to get the experience.
 
“It’s about seeing what people can bring to the role, and from my point of view, what you can do to improve the recruitment process as an employer.”
 

 
Motor vehicle students studying for a Level 2 diploma were part of interview sessions with Mon Motors on Thursday April 4.
 
HR manager Sally Wade, dealer’s personal assistant Toni Preston and sales manager Barry Russell gave up their time to meet the students.
 
They prepared feedback, assessing students on the way they answered questions and how they prepared for the interview.
 
Lecturer Glyn Mountjoy said: “It gives them that experience of being interviewed by professionals in the motor industry. Some of the students were nervous because it’s the first time they have been put in front of anybody in an interview situation.
 
“The course is there to progress them into employment and this is part of it. The feedback will show how they can improve on their interview skills.”
 

Football Academy, News

Bath College to launch new women’s football academy in September

 

Bath College is excited to announce the launch of a new women’s football academy in partnership with Bath City FC.
 
Spaces are available for up to 20 players aged 16 to 19 to start training with the academy at Odd Down Sports Ground in September.
 
The academy will be unique to Bath and will build on the success of the men’s programme with the Bath City Football Academy.
 
It will also help to meet an increasing demand for women’s football from young players in the past few years.
 
Sports lecturer Paul Blenkinsopp, from Bath College, said: “We’ve been working in partnership with Bath City FC over the last three years to develop the men’s programme and we’ve also had a number of enquiries from people asking ‘do you offer women’s football?’
 
“We’re working with the Bath City Community Sports Foundation and they already run training sessions for year 10 and 11 pupils. They’ve told us they have a lot of young female players and coaches, so there’s a definite demand for this.”
 
Players training with the women’s football academy will train three times a week. One session will be based at the Bath College gym and two sessions will be at Odd Down Sports Ground.
 
They will play matches on Wednesday as part of the ECFA (English Colleges Football Association) and will study for a Level 2 or Level 3 BTEC in sport.
 
The college sports department has a number of staff who either play or coach football and, as a result, they are very excited about the new programme.
 
Mr Blenkinsopp, said: “The big thing is that we’re going to offer something unique for the Bath area, and by working with the community sports foundation we’ll also be able to offer existing students work experience placements.
 
“It’s a great opportunity for young female football players.”
 
To find out about the women’s football academy call (01225) 312191 or e-mail paul.blenkinsopp@bathcollege.ac.uk.
 
You can register your interest in the new programme here.
 

Football Academy, News

Women at the Game: Music student to support Bath City FC event

 

Music student Ruby Donadel is supporting an event at Twerton Park set up to show women why watching football can be great fun.
 
Bath City FC is encouraging as many women as possible to come along to its match against Hemel Hempstead on Saturday March 11th.
 
Female fans are invited to a reception before the game where they can get together, chat and enjoy some pre-match refreshments.
 
The event is part of a national initiative called ‘Women at the Game’ and coincides with International Women’s Day on March 8th.
 

 
Ruby, who is studying Level 3 music performance at Bath College, will be playing a live acoustic set for guests at the reception.
 
The 18-year-old is a big football fan and used to play football for a number of local teams, including Yeovil Town Ladies FC.
 
She said: “I played football for seven years. It’s always been seen as a men’s hobby but it’s getting more popular with women – especially with the success of the England women’s team.
 
“At the moment you’re outnumbered if you go to watch a game, but I’ve never had a problem with it. If you love the sport, it’s really fun.
 
“I’m singing at the event because I love the cause, I thought it was a great idea and wanted to help. I’m in the final year of my course, so I’ve done quite a lot of gigs but I’ve never played at a football match before. I’m looking forward to it, it will be a good experience.”
 
Bath City FC is about to become a community-owned club and is committed to strengthening its links to the local community.
 
Female fans will be on-hand to guide new visitors to the reception, which starts at 2pm – an hour before the match kick-off. Tickets are available here.
 

Care Academy, News

Bath College Care Academy: Students learn from professionals in the health and social care sector

 

Professionals working in the health and social care sector volunteered their time to work with students at Bath College, passing on knowledge and expertise during a busy and interactive employability day.
 
The day marked the launch of the college’s Care Academy, designed to link health and social care students with a wide range of employers working in the South West.
 
Last year, Bath College was awarded £40,000 worth of government funding to kick-start the Care Academy and recruit an academy coordinator.
 
As a result, the college has been working with its Care Academy partners to strengthen training, increase work experience opportunities, and help students find employment within the health and social care sector.
 
Students studying at the college had the chance to meet professionals working in a variety of health and social care roles over the course of the day.
 

 
Third year student Lauren Pearl, 17, said: “I’ve been learning about mental health issues and talking about how you can help people who have an addiction.
 
“This is my final year at college and it has definitely helped me to speak to these health professionals, who have given me a lot of useful information.”
 
Dawn Corse, an occupational therapist with Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust, led a workshop demonstrating the best way to communicate with people with dementia.
 
Media make-up and drama students were involved in the workshop, preparing a role-play about a dementia patient and her carer.
 
Throughout the day, students met representatives from Sirona care & health, Creativity Works, BANES Youth Connect & Health, Dorothy House, Bath Mind, Action on Addiction, healthcare company Dimensions and the Red Cross.
 
They also learnt how to use a hoist and move patients with limited mobility during a workshop led by Les Taylor and Rachael Sheppard, from Way Ahead Care.
 

 
Claire Hurford, from Way Ahead Care, said: “We’ve been working with the Care Academy from the beginning. If we start working with these students now, they will come to us with more experience and be work-ready.
 
“It’s about showing students what career routes they can take and how they can progress. I started as a community care and support worker, and now I’m working as a care manager.
 
“We know there’s a huge deficit for social care staff and, as people are living longer, we need more staff working with people to help them stay in their homes.”
 
Lilly Webb, widening participation officer at Bath RUH, was part of a team showing students how to resuscitate someone using CPR.
 
She said: “For us it’s great to have an opportunity to spend time with Bath College students to help them understand what a career in health looks like and to help them gain relevant skills and knowledge.
 
“Last year we ran a pilot programme, with Bath College students coming into the RUH. This was really successful and we hope to be able to welcome some more students this year.”
 
Sally Wilson, Care Academy Coordinator, said: “There has been a real buzz in the Care Academy today, with students sharing their experiences with staff and their peers. The variety of workshops on offer was fantastic and gave them a real insight into the broad range of careers and environments they could work in within the sector. We are very grateful to all network partners who have facilitated exciting sessions today.”
 
Next week, Bath College will launch an eight-week pilot course for students and care home workers in partnership with Creativity Works.
 
The course, taught on Tuesday evenings, will explore the benefit of using the arts in care homes, including drama, visual art, dance and poetry.
 
Spaces are still available for the course, which starts on January 31 and takes place in the evenings between 6pm and 8pm.
 
Visit http://www.creativityworks.org.uk/ or e-mail ailsaeaglestone@zoho.com
 

Football Academy, News

Spaces available for the Bath City Football Academy in September

 

The Bath City Football Academy is searching for talented young players interested in developing a professional sports career.
 

Twenty-five spaces are available for players aged 16 to 19, to start training with head coach Billy Clark in September.
 

Teenagers will have the chance to play at Twerton Park in the South West Youth Counties League and will complete a national diploma in sport at Bath College.
 

Bradley Champion, 16, from Bath, started at the academy last year and has enjoyed the opportunity to train regularly.
 

He said: “I have made new friends, my teammates have become my best friends. When I see them play it encourages me to develop.”
 

Players at the academy will train three or four afternoons each week, with one or two matches per week.
 

They will be picked to compete in the ECFA Premier League, the South West Counties League or the ECFA South West North League.
 

Students can also choose to study two types of diplomas, designed to prepare students for employment or higher education.
 

Sports lecturer Paul Blenkinsopp said: “A lot of people think ‘you go to an academy and if you don’t make it where can you go?’ We have the right exit routes to help them progress into different careers.
 

“We’re giving them the best of both worlds. If you’re interested in going to university you will follow our route to higher education course and study for a BTEC Extended Diploma in Sport, which is the equivalent of three A-levels.
 

“If you’re more interested in employment you will follow our route to employment course and study for a BTEC Subsidiary Diploma in Sport, which is the equivalent of two A-levels, as well as additional qualifications.”
 

Head coach Billy Clark spent most of his career with Bristol Rovers and is keen to give players the best start for the future.
 

He said: “In the past we’ve recruited players from far and wide, from Swindon, Westbury, Radstock, Bristol and Bath.
 

“My aim is to enhance and develop the players, as footballers and as people, preparing them for adult life. Ultimately I am aiming to develop players that will be good enough to play for Bath City.
 

“An important part of this process is the club’s link with the University of Bath, where players can go to continue their football and education program.
 

“Some players who progress from the academy programme take up scholarships in America. Others have become coaches and most continue to play for clubs at western league, southern league and conference league levels.
 

“To date, six players have played for the Bath City first team and many more have played for the club’s under 21 development squad.

“The overall opportunity for students is excellent.”
 

To find out about the Bath City Football Academy call (01225) 312191 or e-mail paul.blenkinsopp@bathcollege.ac.uk
 

For website information click here.

Care Academy, News

Bath College awarded £40,000 to kick-start new care academy

 

Bath College has been awarded £40,000 worth of government funding to kick-start a new care academy, designed to link students with local employers.

 

The funding, awarded by Health Education England, will pay for an academy coordinator and specialist equipment for practical sessions.

 

Health and social care students will learn how to use equipment in a dedicated space, set up with hoists and hospital beds to prepare them for working with people in their homes.

 

They will also benefit from a new structure of training and work placements, provided by local employers partnering with the Bath Care Academy.

 

Following the launch of the Care Certificate in March 2015, employers must make sure new starters meet an identified set of standards before they can work with patients.

 

The Bath Care Academy aims to make sure students complete the Care Certificate as part of their training and are ready to work in the health and social care sector.

 

Esther Williams, Head of Sport, Leisure and Care, said: “Health and social care for us is a huge growth area, with 210 students currently studying health and social care at the college.

 

“What we are doing is aligning our curriculum with the needs of local employers. The health sector is the largest employer in the West of England, providing 72,400 jobs, and we want to work with employers to ensure that our students are studying programmes that adequately prepare them for those roles.

 

“We’ve set up a healthcare network to strengthen our understanding of the needs of our partners, which include the Royal United Hospital, Way Ahead Care, Dorothy House Hospice and Sirona Care & Health.

 

“We have recognised a need to develop a more structured placement system for students, so they can experience a number of the wide-ranging roles in the sector, and gain an understanding that better prepares them for a job.

 

“The Bath Care Academy coordinator will help us to create a programme that matches learners to organisations, and acts as a pipeline to send students into local employment or apprenticeships on completion of their course.”

 

Health and social care students met employers signed up to the Bath Care Academy on January 12, as part of an employability day. They took part in a networking lunch and attended sessions with employers to learn about opportunities available with each company.

 

Nardina Storey is from the learning and development team at Bath RUH.

 

She said: “We’re trying to engage a younger workforce. In today’s society it’s recognised that we need to invest more in young people. They call us an older workforce, but we’re trying to change that. We’re showcasing work experience opportunities that we can offer young people.”

 

Karen Gleave, from Sirona Care & Health, said: “It’s about trying to give people different opportunities.

 

“They’re not just going to one work placement, so they’re able to make better choices. It’s about giving back to the local community as well, supporting young people onto apprenticeships and career pathways.”

Football Academy, News

Sports student Ollie Bassett signs professional contract with Yeovil Town

 

Bath College student Ollie Bassett has signed a professional contract with Yeovil Town just three months after making his debut with the first team.

 

The 17-year-old became Yeovil’s youngest ever football league player when he played for the team against Crawley Town in September.

 

He has secured a future with Yeovil Town until June 2017 and will also continue studying for a BTEC Level 3 sports qualification at Bath College.

 

Bath College lecturer Paul Blenkinsopp said: “It’s really good for him and it’s really good that we can say we have a professional player studying with us.

 

“I would say he’s very focused as a player. With Ollie, he’s a down to earth kid – there’s no airs or graces about him.

 

“He comes in to work hard and the staff get on well with him. He’s one of those boys where you’re happy it’s happened to him.”

 

Bath College runs two football academies in partnership with Southampton and Bath City FC, giving students the chance to play against top teams.

 

Players at the Southampton academy train with Yeovil two days a week and play for the Yeovil under 18s team on Saturday.

 

The signing signals a bright future for Ollie, from Packington, Leicestershire, who came to Bath after playing at Aston Villa’s academy.

 

He said: “After the Crawley game I didn’t know it was coming, but I thought there was a good chance.

 

“I played the following week against Hartlepool and I was just hoping they would offer me something.

 

“It’s a good opportunity. I didn’t get a scholarship at Aston Villa so I might have just packed it in, but Southampton gave me a second chance.

 

“It’s good to get a college course behind you in case it doesn’t work out. I have something to fall back on.

 

“I’m excited to start full-time next year. I’m looking forward to playing football five days a week.”

 

Ollie’s signing has created a buzz in the sports department at Bath College and has been an inspiration for other students there.

 

Mr Blenkinsopp said: “He could at the end of that, if he does well, get offered a three to four year deal. Or another club might see him and want to offer him something.

 

“As well as educating them, hopefully football-wise we’re giving them some good opportunities to progress. Obviously we want to get players back into football.

 

“Originally Ollie came from the Aston Villa Academy. He’s technically a very good player. He probably didn’t make it at Aston Villa because of his size, but over the next few years he will develop that.

 

“It’s good for our students here. It shows that it can be done for the ones that work hard there is an opportunity to get back into the game.”

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