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Students and Staff at Launch of Slow Shopping project at Waitrose

News

Slow Shopping pilot takes off as Bath College students set up assisted shopping scheme

 
From 10am-12pm every Tuesday at Waitrose Bath, shopping becomes a little more manageable for those who ordinarily find it a difficult experience.

 

Slow Shopping UK, helps anyone with visible, invisible or intellectual disabilities who may find shopping stressful or challenging. Bath College Care Academy are working in partnership with St John’s Foundation and Waitrose to create peaceful and calming atmosphere, all the while having social care students, volunteers and staff assisting shoppers.
 

The Care Academy at Bath College has recently been accredited as a Skills for Care Endorsed Provider, demonstrating high quality learning and development in the adult social care sector.
 

The pilot launched in January and has been met with much enthusiasm. It will be running until June, but students hope it will become a permanent fixture.
 
Katelyn, a Health & Social Care student at Bath College explained why it’s important to her: “My Nan has dementia and my grandad used to help her with her shopping. This is a great opportunity to help others who may be in a similar position”
 
“This project also helps challenge the stereotypes older people may have of us as young students, as well as the preconceptions we may have of them.”
 
Slow Shopping is an inclusive and safe environment for anyone who feels vulnerable to safely and slowly shop. On entering the store, shoppers are welcomed by a member of the team and shown an information point where they can seek help.
 
Staff and volunteers are located at help points around Waitrose to help people with their shopping – be it helping with queries, answering questions or helping with lifting and carrying.
 
Shoppers are welcome to just show up on the day, or if you would like to book assistance in advance then please contact Sally Wilson, Care Academy Coordinator at Bath College on 01225 328692 or Sally.Wilson@bathcollege.ac.uk and she will arrange for you to be met on arrival.
 
 
Who is Slow Shopping for?
The service is set up for anyone who may find shopping difficult. Slow Shopping founder Katherine Vero said the service is for: “Anyone who needs more time and presents a space in which it is safe to take time to think.”
 
“This might include those who suffer from anxiety, those with communication or literacy difficulties, the elderly, those suffering with dementia as well as those who have more visible disabilities.”
 
“It is not just for people with disabilities though – absolutely anyone is welcome and no-one will be identified. This is an inclusive project and is not meant to exclude anyone.”
 
“If people would like some help they can chat to a member of staff, but equally if people just want to be left alone and shop in peace, they can do that too.”
 
“Shopping is an essential part of our lives and involves social interaction, health, financial awareness and being out in the everyday day world. Many carers and friends and families also find shopping very challenging.”

 

News

Care Academy Learn a Skills Day

 

Bath College Care Academy students enjoyed a Learn a Skills Day on 24th January, taking part in a broad range of workshops facilitated by visiting Health and Social Care Practitioners.

 

The aim of the day was for students to work with practitioners to participate in practical workshops to learn a new skill for the field of health and social care and to develop their skills and confidence.

 

The workshops were run by practitioners from the University of the West of England Nursing and Midwifery team, Action on Addiction, Way Ahead Care, The Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust, Banes Youth Connect, Off the Record, Avon and Wiltshire Partnership Care Home Liaison Team, Dorothy House Hospice Care, Sirona Care and Health, Dimensions and United Response.

 

Rebecca Scutt, Widening Participation Assistant at the Royal United Hospital, attended the event with the Medical Physics team who demonstrated how to use equipment, such as a spectrum analyser. Rebecca said that “it’s been great to meet the students and they were really interested in the activities.” She added that “this event gave students a unique opportunity to get an insight into health careers through interactive activities in a classroom setting.”

The workshops covered topics including, working with families experiencing addiction, youth culture, nursing, learning disabilities nursing, midwifery, emotional health and wellbeing, occupational therapy, dementia, creative and therapeutic activities within support work, the use of diagnostic equipment and the use of social media in supporting vulnerable people.

 

Monique Esson, a participating student said “the whole day gave us a sense of enthusiasm about possible future careers.”

 

Another student, Georgina Singer, summarising the day said “it was a good opportunity to meet experienced people who can give us an insight into what it’s really like to work in those settings.”

 

Megan Clifford, who took part in one of the nursing workshops said “It was helpful to learn how to take a pulse in case you’re ever in an emergency.”

 

Sally Wilson, Care Academy Coordinator, who organised the event said, “this was a wonderful opportunity for students to meet a wide range of practitioners and to learn more about the wonderful field of health and Social care.”

 

As well as helping with their employability skills, it has also inspired so many of our students, helping to inform their study programme here and their future career aspirations. We really appreciate the time and support so many practitioners have given for this event!

 

Care Academy – Learn a Skill Day

Learn a Skill Day – Open to Care Academy Students

Bath College – City Centre Campus (John Wood Building)

Wednesday 24th January 2018


 

The aim of the day will be for students to work with practitioners, who work for a range of health and social care organisations, to participate in practical workshops to learn a new skill.

This will help to inspire, challenge and broaden students’ knowledge of the range of work within the field of health and social care, and to promote Health and social care employment opportunities both paid and unpaid.

There will be a drop in session during the lunchtime period, for students to talk to practitioners in more detail about employment opportunities, career paths and work experience.

 


Care Academy, News

Bath College Care Academy: Students learn from professionals in the health and social care sector

 

Professionals working in the health and social care sector volunteered their time to work with students at Bath College, passing on knowledge and expertise during a busy and interactive employability day.
 
The day marked the launch of the college’s Care Academy, designed to link health and social care students with a wide range of employers working in the South West.
 
Last year, Bath College was awarded £40,000 worth of government funding to kick-start the Care Academy and recruit an academy coordinator.
 
As a result, the college has been working with its Care Academy partners to strengthen training, increase work experience opportunities, and help students find employment within the health and social care sector.
 
Students studying at the college had the chance to meet professionals working in a variety of health and social care roles over the course of the day.
 

 
Third year student Lauren Pearl, 17, said: “I’ve been learning about mental health issues and talking about how you can help people who have an addiction.
 
“This is my final year at college and it has definitely helped me to speak to these health professionals, who have given me a lot of useful information.”
 
Dawn Corse, an occupational therapist with Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust, led a workshop demonstrating the best way to communicate with people with dementia.
 
Media make-up and drama students were involved in the workshop, preparing a role-play about a dementia patient and her carer.
 
Throughout the day, students met representatives from Sirona care & health, Creativity Works, BANES Youth Connect & Health, Dorothy House, Bath Mind, Action on Addiction, healthcare company Dimensions and the Red Cross.
 
They also learnt how to use a hoist and move patients with limited mobility during a workshop led by Les Taylor and Rachael Sheppard, from Way Ahead Care.
 

 
Claire Hurford, from Way Ahead Care, said: “We’ve been working with the Care Academy from the beginning. If we start working with these students now, they will come to us with more experience and be work-ready.
 
“It’s about showing students what career routes they can take and how they can progress. I started as a community care and support worker, and now I’m working as a care manager.
 
“We know there’s a huge deficit for social care staff and, as people are living longer, we need more staff working with people to help them stay in their homes.”
 
Lilly Webb, widening participation officer at Bath RUH, was part of a team showing students how to resuscitate someone using CPR.
 
She said: “For us it’s great to have an opportunity to spend time with Bath College students to help them understand what a career in health looks like and to help them gain relevant skills and knowledge.
 
“Last year we ran a pilot programme, with Bath College students coming into the RUH. This was really successful and we hope to be able to welcome some more students this year.”
 
Sally Wilson, Care Academy Coordinator, said: “There has been a real buzz in the Care Academy today, with students sharing their experiences with staff and their peers. The variety of workshops on offer was fantastic and gave them a real insight into the broad range of careers and environments they could work in within the sector. We are very grateful to all network partners who have facilitated exciting sessions today.”
 
Next week, Bath College will launch an eight-week pilot course for students and care home workers in partnership with Creativity Works.
 
The course, taught on Tuesday evenings, will explore the benefit of using the arts in care homes, including drama, visual art, dance and poetry.
 
Spaces are still available for the course, which starts on January 31 and takes place in the evenings between 6pm and 8pm.
 
Visit http://www.creativityworks.org.uk/ or e-mail ailsaeaglestone@zoho.com
 

Care Academy, News

Bath College awarded £40,000 to kick-start new care academy

 

Bath College has been awarded £40,000 worth of government funding to kick-start a new care academy, designed to link students with local employers.

 

The funding, awarded by Health Education England, will pay for an academy coordinator and specialist equipment for practical sessions.

 

Health and social care students will learn how to use equipment in a dedicated space, set up with hoists and hospital beds to prepare them for working with people in their homes.

 

They will also benefit from a new structure of training and work placements, provided by local employers partnering with the Bath Care Academy.

 

Following the launch of the Care Certificate in March 2015, employers must make sure new starters meet an identified set of standards before they can work with patients.

 

The Bath Care Academy aims to make sure students complete the Care Certificate as part of their training and are ready to work in the health and social care sector.

 

Esther Williams, Head of Sport, Leisure and Care, said: “Health and social care for us is a huge growth area, with 210 students currently studying health and social care at the college.

 

“What we are doing is aligning our curriculum with the needs of local employers. The health sector is the largest employer in the West of England, providing 72,400 jobs, and we want to work with employers to ensure that our students are studying programmes that adequately prepare them for those roles.

 

“We’ve set up a healthcare network to strengthen our understanding of the needs of our partners, which include the Royal United Hospital, Way Ahead Care, Dorothy House Hospice and Sirona Care & Health.

 

“We have recognised a need to develop a more structured placement system for students, so they can experience a number of the wide-ranging roles in the sector, and gain an understanding that better prepares them for a job.

 

“The Bath Care Academy coordinator will help us to create a programme that matches learners to organisations, and acts as a pipeline to send students into local employment or apprenticeships on completion of their course.”

 

Health and social care students met employers signed up to the Bath Care Academy on January 12, as part of an employability day. They took part in a networking lunch and attended sessions with employers to learn about opportunities available with each company.

 

Nardina Storey is from the learning and development team at Bath RUH.

 

She said: “We’re trying to engage a younger workforce. In today’s society it’s recognised that we need to invest more in young people. They call us an older workforce, but we’re trying to change that. We’re showcasing work experience opportunities that we can offer young people.”

 

Karen Gleave, from Sirona Care & Health, said: “It’s about trying to give people different opportunities.

 

“They’re not just going to one work placement, so they’re able to make better choices. It’s about giving back to the local community as well, supporting young people onto apprenticeships and career pathways.”

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